Tuna Salad Two Ways

I like to think of tuna as a “power food.” It’s cheap, has tons of protein, and can morph into different dishes.

Most of the time, I stick to the old faithful tuna salad recipe – tuna, boiled egg, mayo, and pickle relish. But sometimes a girl needs to shake it up a bit!

I used to work at a hair salon in the Virginia Highlands across the street from an Atlanta favorite – Alon’s Bakery (the original!). I haunted that place at least twice a week for breakfast or lunch, and after a while it really started to take a toll on my wallet. So, I’ve experimented quite a few times with re-creating some of their flavors that I crave. One of my favorite things to get for lunch was their tuna salad. They make it two different ways, each equally delicious and different.

As a side note, the tuna salad at Alon’s is the ONLY tuna I’ll eat besides my own. This girl doesn’t eat sketchy tuna!

Classic Tuna Salad

  • 2 cans chunk light tuna in water (Alon’s is fancier than me, they use solid white albacore)
  • 1 Tsp spicy brown mustard
  • 2 Tsp light mayo (I don’t like my salad too full of mayo, I keep it fairly light on this part.)
  • 1 Tsp finely chopped red onion (I don’t like a ton of raw red onion. If you like it and want more of it, be my guest.)
  • 2 scallions (greens down to whites) chopped
  • 2 baby carrots, grated (I know it’s odd to use baby carrots, but it’s the only carrot I had. It gave me about 1 1/2 Tsp of finely grated carrot)
  • S&P to taste

Drain the tuna thoroughly and combine in a medium-sized bowl with the other ingredients. Be sure to taste for salt and pepper before you add any, some varieties of canned tuna can be pretty salty on their own.

Tuscan Tuna Salad

  • 2 cans chunk light tuna in water (You could also use the kind packed in oil for a more “authentic” taste)
  • juice of 1/2 a lemon
  • 2 tsp dried parsley (or 1 Tsp fresh chopped parsley)
  • 1 1/2 tsp capers (Don’t be afraid of capers, they’re like baby olives! If you don’t want to buy or use them, you could try subbing them for finely chopped black Kalamata olives – same “briny” taste as capers.)
  • Drizzle of olive oil
  • S&P to taste

Drain the tuna thoroughly and combine in a medium-sized bowl with the other ingredients. Be sure to taste for salt and pepper before you add any, some varieties of canned tuna can be pretty salty on their own.

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